Archive for the 'tribes' Category

« Previous Entries

A Bad Guy with a Gun | A Hand Placed on the Heart


The phrase comes more from the movies than from real life. On our television screens we see a character called “the bad guy with a gun.” The narrative makes sure we know he is unredeemable. The story tells us evil must be destroyed or it will flourish. The hero, the person we identify with, does the deed. In the context of the story, the killing is justified—it’s a manifestation of justice.

The National Rifle Association helps gun manufacturers sell guns by convincing consumers that to be the hero of the story, all they need to do is purchase a gun. Pull out a credit card and be transformed into “the good guy with a gun.” The consumer is programmed to be the “hero” who will stand for justice against the “bad guy with a gun.”

While the media fully understands this narrative is completely and fatally false, they nonetheless rebroadcast it at every opportunity. But when something happens in real life—a hostage situation at the Trader Joe’s in Silver Lake, California, they neglect to tell the story of how the standoff was defused.

The man with the gun, gave up his gun, allowed himself to be handcuffed and surrendered to the authorities. There was no “good guy with a gun.” There was a woman who took control and showed the world what a hero is.

MaryLinda Moss, a 55-year-old artist who exudes calm, feared a suicidal gunman could spark a bloodbath. Through a series of disastrous decisions by Atkins, dozens of strangers had ended up at the grocery store on a hot Saturday afternoon, drenched in fear and surrounded by SWAT teams, helicopters, squad cars and ambulances.

She put her hand on his heart.

“I told him: ‘There’s always hope. I know you have a good heart, and I know you don’t want to hurt anybody.’”

Atkins, 28, protested: “You don’t know what I’ve done.”

Read the story by Robin Abcarian of the LA Times about what happened inside the store on that day. This isn’t a story from a television drama; it’s about what a woman did when faced with a wounded man with a loaded gun. MaryLinda Moss stopped the men with guns—all of them. They had all been pre-programmed to play their parts in a made-for-TV drama. A different story played out. A better story.

The tender, terrifying truth about what happened inside the Trader Joe’s hostage siege

 

Everybody Must Get Stoned

Here’s another “pro tip” for the media. They seem to have trouble locating an appropriate frame for the antics of President Donald John Trump. They’re used to finding political and policy strategy when they look for it. This President is purely tactical; he exists from one moment to the next.

Here are two tactics that have been successful for him.

The first tactic is reducing the pressure on yesterday’s outrage with a new outrage today. These rolling outrages overwhelm the capacity of the media. Unable the prioritize or distinguish what’s important from what’s not, the media is rolled on a daily basis. This tactic can be used to set the agenda by driving the outrages into the direction of wedge issues. Since it’s not illegal to lie to the media, that’s the primary tactic. This tactic surprises the media over and over again.



The second tactic is manufacturing targets for his mob. You can find the perfect normalization of this tactic in Shirley Jackson’s short story “The Lottery.” In Jackson’s story the target for stoning is chosen by lottery while the whole community dutifully takes part in the event. In Trump’s world, to refrain from throwing stones is to succumb to political correctness.

Stoning is a method of execution during which a group of people, usually peers of the guilty party, throws stones at the condemned person until he or she dies. Death by stoning was prescribed in the Old Testament Law as a punishment for various sins. Both animals and people could be the subjects of stoning (Exodus 21:28), and stoning seems to have been associated with sins that caused irreparable damage to the spiritual or ceremonial purity of a person or an animal.

Hillary Rodham Clinton has been Trump’s target par excellence. Over the years, through an extended campaign, the mob has been given permission to throw stones at her. Anything is allowed in an attack on a person condemned to stoning. The reason Trump can’t let her go, even though the election has long since past, is that he hasn’t found a target that his mobs like as well. The other thing that made it work was that the mainstream media felt that they too had permission to throw stones at Clinton.

Trump’s Twitter attacks are the way he tests new targets. Currently he’s auditioning Colin Kaepernick for the role of scapegoat. The quarterback certainly seemed to fit the mold, although Trump’s run into some unexpected resistance. While initially the media was happy to throw stones at Kaepernick, recently they seem to have discovered the other side of the story.

The social madness of stoning is the primary metaphor of Trump’s political power. In some respects, this is why individual Republican politicians fear him. They understand that they could easily be the next target. It becomes easier to follow what Trump is doing once you realize that all he really wants is another good target for the stones of his mob. His search isn’t restricted by ideology or party loyalty, Trump is simply looking for the freedom to stone some person or group to death.



Mars: The Self-Deportation of the 1%

Elon Musk's new plan to enable the self-deportation of the 1% is to be applauded. And as someone once said, “Mars is next.” Earth, you've had your chance. The 1% have never really been of this planet earth, the planet was given to them as raw material to build their family empires. And Mars may offer the largest single source of new raw material available.

Musk has acknowledged that the 1% will need to pool their fortunes to fund this effort. As a community of rugged individualists, they will shun government handouts in pursuit of their goal. Self-funding of self-deportation is a core value of the mission.

Self-deportation as a method of addressing the income inequality problem is relatively new. The theory goes that global warming, the sixth mass extinction and the possibility of a doomsday event has made the planet earth so unwelcoming it has incentivized the 1% to seek refuge on Mars.

Musk is open about the fact that some of the 1% will die in an effort to establish and sustain a city on Mars. It will be a sort of culling of the herd and will make the 1% even better and stronger.

SpaceX, Musk's firm, has said, “this is for everyone, this technology to self-deport the 1% is for humanity.”

 

Where’s Twitter’s Aksimet?

Why doesn't Twitter have something like WordPress's Akismet? Akismet is a plugin that filters spam by combining information about spam captured on all participating sites. It uses that information to generate rules to block future spam. I know that bad actors can easily create new Twitter accounts, but should also be easy for a large group of people to tag them in real time.

And I'd imagine if you can create an algorithm that can predict what you'd like to buy, surely an algorithm could be created to identify both hate speech and the speaker based on a few online real-time gestures. Identifying these storms of attacks, like the ones against Leslie Jones, is not too different from identifying the events that Twitter wants to sell advertising against.

Twitter valued being unfiltered at a certain point, but now the stream is quite polluted.

 

« Previous Entries